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Fitch ratings downgrades Nigeria’s foreign cu

Fitch ratings downgrades Nigeria’s foreign cu
Photo by Vardan Papikyan- Ask Nigeria

Nigeria’s long-term foreign currency has been rated to ‘B-’ from ‘B’.

Fitch Ratings has reduced Nigeria’s long-term foreign currency Issuer Default Rating (IDR) from ‘B’ to ‘B-,’ putting Africa’s largest oil producer just six notches above default and on par with Ecuador and Angola. The new report comes only weeks after Moody’s, a worldwide ratings organization, cut Nigeria’s local currency and foreign currency long-term issuer ratings, as well as its foreign currency senior unsecured debt ratings, to B3 from B2. According to Moody’s, the decision was motivated by a considerable worsening in Nigeria’s government finances in 2022, despite a big rise in international crude oil prices.

Following in the footsteps of Moody’s, Fitch, a prominent worldwide rating agency, stated that the new downgrading was due to increased government debt service expenses and deteriorating external liquidity, notwithstanding higher crude prices in 2022, among other factors. It also stated that in the first half of 2022, interest payments on debt stock exceeded government revenue. The organization emphasized that poor oil output and the costly gasoline subsidy absorbed the majority of the fiscal benefits of high oil prices this year and would continue to stress already low government revenue levels.

If the subsidy payment is reduced in 2023, it would aid public finances.

According to Fitch, reducing subsidy payments in 2023 will boost governmental finances. It said, however, that restricted oil output and fundamentally low domestic non-oil revenue mobilization will limit potential advantages. Fitch anticipates the implicit subsidy on petrol will cost the government roughly N5 trillion, or 2.4 percent of GDP, in lost income from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) in 2022. According to the research, this is likely to contribute to an increase in the general government fiscal deficit to 6.1% of GDP.

The lost revenue is due to the difference between the regulated pump price of petrol, which has averaged N190 per litre, and the import cost, which is more than N300 per litre. The rating agency stated that the Petroleum Industry Act (PIA) 2021 calls for the use of market prices for refined gasoline products, but that plans to phase out the subsidy in 2022 have been delayed due to rising global oil prices.

The election in February 2023 will bring a new administration.

Fitch noted that the February 2023 election will usher in a new administration, which will almost certainly submit a supplemental budget, and that there will be public pressure to keep the gasoline subsidy in place. According to Fitch, Nigeria’s debt would reach 34% of GDP by the end of 2022. The Federal Government of Nigeria’s (FGN) overdraft with the Central Bank of Nigeria is included (CBN). Nigeria’s debt stock is low in comparison to the anticipated ‘B’ median of 57.6 percent of GDP in 2022. Its debt servicing indicators, on the other hand, are among the best among Fitch-rated sovereigns.

Additionally, it anticipates that the general election in February 2023 will exacerbate security concerns in oil-producing areas, but that the restart of the Forcados export terminal and the Trans-Niger pipeline could assist to mitigate ongoing losses from theft and vandalism. The report predicted that the current account would shift into a modest surplus in 2022 from a deficit of 0.4% in 2021, noting that while higher oil prices have improved oil export receipts, part of this has been offset by higher fuel imports.  The current account has improved, although Fitch predicts that reserves will end 2022 at $36.3 billion, down from $40.2 billion in 2021, and will continue to decline in 2023–2024.

The government faces external debt amortizations of $2.4 billion in 2023.

According to estimates, the government will have to pay $2.4 billion in 2023 and $2.7 billion in 2024 to pay off its foreign debt. These costs will be covered by a combination of reserves withdrawal and additional borrowing from the outside world, most likely in the form of syndicated loans. The total external debt service will account for 11.8% of current external receipts in 2022, down from the median prediction for grade “B” of 18.6%, predicts Fitch. Fitch predicted that the expansion of the service sectors will continue to underpin GDP growth, which it expects to be 3.0% in 2022 and 3.1% in 2023. Similar to what Moody’s had stated, Externally, financial and capital outflows from Nigeria are exceeding the current account surplus, depleting foreign exchange reserves.


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SarahDiv
SarahDiv
4 months ago

There several factors responsible for this new currency rating such as the global inflation, our government incompetency, terrorism and corrupt practices in government offices.

jdpumping
jdpumping
4 months ago

This our debt is so overwhelming and bringing about other things affecting our economy as large I just hope the new administration will usher in new tidings.

Abusi
Abusi
4 months ago

We know our currency has lost its worth. We should try and see the ways Naira can get back to it’s feet. The decline in the economy also brought about the fall in the value of naira.

Adeolastan
Adeolastan
4 months ago

The financial activities in Nigeria is very opaque because of corruption,when present government came into power they increased fuel price and told us there was no subsidy payment again and after some years truth came out that they have been printing money secretly to settle the subsidy.

DimOla
DimOla
4 months ago

Nigeria is at the verge of destruction due to mismanagement by our greedy politicians who only think about themselves. Too many loans, insurgencies coupled with inflation as resulted in Fitch ratings downgrades Nigerian foreign currency from B2 to B3.

Tonerol10
Tonerol10
4 months ago

Nigeria’s long-term foreign currency has been rated to ‘B-’ from ‘B’. Bad leadership has really lead to bad state in this country. they don’t Care at all, they have bad mind. look at what they have turn the country to

Kazeem1
Kazeem1
4 months ago

Moody downgraded Nigeria’s long-term issuer ratings in both its local currency and its foreign currency. This fresh revelation comes just a few short weeks after Moody’s announcement.

Chibuzor
Chibuzor
4 months ago

Despite a large increase in worldwide crude oil prices in 2022, Nigeria’s government finances deteriorated significantly, prompting the decision.

Nwachukwu Kingsley
Nwachukwu Kingsley
4 months ago

A leading international ratings agency explained the latest downgrade as a result of rising government debt service costs and weakening external liquidity.

Taiwoo
Taiwoo
4 months ago

This year’s high oil prices were supposed to be a boon to the budget, but the organization warned that weak oil production and the expensive gasoline subsidies had eaten up much of those gains.

Godsewill Ifeanyi
Godsewill Ifeanyi
4 months ago

These expenses will be paid for through a combination of drawing down reserves and taking out additional loans from people and institutions in the wider world, most likely in the form of syndicated loans.

Christiana
Christiana
4 months ago

Externally, financial and capital outflows from Nigeria are exceeding the current account surplus, resulting in a depletion of the country’s foreign exchange reserves. This is similar to what Moody’s had stated previously.

Adesanyaj72
Adesanyaj72
4 months ago

There are a number of factors that have contributed to this new currency rating, including global inflation, the incompetence of our government, acts of terrorism, and corrupt practices that are commonplace in government offices.

Bola12
Bola12
4 months ago

security worries in oil-producing areas are expected to increase ahead of the general election in February 2023, although the reopening of the Forcados export terminal and the Trans-Niger pipeline should help reduce losses caused by theft and vandalism.

Hassan Isa
Hassan Isa
4 months ago

Market pricing should be used for refined gasoline products, but plans to eliminate the subsidy in 2022 have been put on hold as a result of rising global oil prices.

Tolaniiii
Tolaniiii
4 months ago

Corruption makes it difficult to see what’s going on with Nigeria’s finances. For example, the current administration covertly printed money to pay for a fuel subsidy after promising to raise prices and telling the public there wouldn’t be any more payments.

Iyanu12345ogg
Iyanu12345ogg
4 months ago

This debt is so overwhelming and bringing about other things affecting our economy as large. The downturn in the economy also brought about the fall in the value of naira.

Haykaylyon26
Haykaylyon26
4 months ago

Selfishness and corruption really spoil our country and making us not to progress poor leadership affect the country from flowing well we have to find way to make our currency have value

Ultra0711
Ultra0711
4 months ago

Nigeria’s financial dealings are shrouded in mystery due to widespread corruption. The current government covertly printed money to pay for fuel subsidies after raising prices and telling the public they wouldn’t be doing so.

theApr
theApr
4 months ago

The group stressed that the costly gasoline subsidy and the insufficient oil output this year consumed the most of the financial benefits of high oil prices, and it would continue to emphasize the already low levels of government revenue.

Remi1
Remi1
4 months ago

These costs will be covered by a mix of depleting reserves and obtaining additional loans from individuals and organizations around the globe, most likely in the form of syndicated loans.

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