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70% of drugs used in Nigeria are imported

70% of drugs used in Nigeria are imported
Photo by Christina Victoria Craft- Ask Nigeria

Importation of medicines threatens drug security in Nigeria.

Reports have it that while 30 percent of drugs used in Nigeria are locally manufactured, 70 percent are imported from China and India. Studies have also revealed that many African countries, including Nigeria, spend not less than $14 billion on importation of pharmaceutical products. However, there is the imperative of national drug security, established in the National Drug Policy, for availability and sufficient supply of affordable and quality drugs for Nigerians. Also, for stimulation of increased local production.

The Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 focuses on good health and wellbeing targeted to Universal Health Coverage (UHC), access to safe, effective, affordable and quality medicines for everyone, and access to quality essential health services. Despite the SDG in place, there was a case of non-availability of drug and medical devices at the State House Medical Centre, Abuja. A report from the Federal Ministry of Health affirmed that drugs prescribed for diabetes or cancer, costs almost five times the monthly wage of a minimum wage worker.

Building an agile supply chain of essential drugs require local production.

Dr. Fidelis Ayebae, Chairman of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Group of Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (PMGMAN), stated that with the help from state governments and development partners after the pandemic to aid post-COVID 19 recovery, production of drug locally has now risen to 45 percent. he added that to build a resilient and agile supply chain of required medicines in the country, the main strategy is to produce them locally. As a result, it aligns with Medicines Security (MS) goal and becomes a sustainable strategy.

CEO and Managing Director of Fidson Healthcare Plc., Ayebae, further stated that through Public Private Partnership (PPP) – African Resource Centre for Excellence (ARC-ESM) and Melinda Gate foundation support – the local pharmaceutical industry is working towards bridging the gap in supply chains of medicines at state level. With these partnerships in states like Nasarawa, Kaduna, Ekiti, Niger, Sokoto and Yobe, there is now a reduction of out of stock to an insignificant number. He believes that this move will birth economic development for Nigeria and capacity building for the Nigerian pharmaceutical industry.

Local production would aid compliance with the rules of GMP.

National Chairman of Clinical Pharmacists Association of Nigeria (CPAN), Dr. Joseph Madu, asserted that some of the factors that make companies prefer importation to local production include lack of patronage of local companies by donor agencies and governments, high tariffs, high costs of production, and high taxation coupled with trade-related barriers on importation of APIs. He also highlighted poverty and lack of education as reasons why Nigerians get cheap imported drugs from traders instead of quality drugs from registered pharmacies – which may be more expensive.

According to the Chairman, if production of medicines occur domestically, regulatory agencies can regularly visit the manufacturing companies to mandate compliance with the rules of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) for production of medicines, which cannot be done to imported drugs. He further highlighted the hazards attached to dependence on importation which include less capacity to create jobs and economic development opportunities, lack of national pride as a production country, lack of sustainable access to quality medicines and loss of revenue.

Compliance with legislative policies of government assures drug security.

Acting Director General of NAFDAC, Dr. Monica Elimunjeze, affirmed that the agency sees the need for drug security and would not cease to strengthen its regulatory processes with a functional regulatory framework. According to NAFDAC, development of products before distribution to patients require clinical trial oversight, ports inspection, chemical evaluation, GMP inspection, laboratory analysis, narcotic control, pharmacovigilance, registration, investigation and enforcement. With these processes in place, drug security is assured as there will be compliance with legislative provisions and policies of government.


Related Link

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Admin
1
22 days ago

70% of drugs used in Nigeria are imported – Importation of medicines threatens drug security in Nigeria. – Express your point of view.

Member
9
22 days ago

It is a shame on us that drugs used in our country are sourced internationally at this present time we are suppose to be manufacturing our own drugs for the citizenry.

Abusi
Member
8
22 days ago

This shows that we are not producing enough in our country..it is true this will pose danger to our drug security. Any drug can just be brought into the country because we need them.

Member
8
22 days ago

It is essential for Nigeria to have national drug security, as outlined in the National Drug Policy, in order to ensure that Nigerians have access to an adequate supply of pharmaceuticals that are both affordable and of high quality.

Member
8
22 days ago

The third Sustainable Development Goal is all about ensuring everyone has access to quality healthcare, also known as universal health coverage.

Member
8
22 days ago

The cost of medications recommended for conditions such as diabetes or cancer is almost five times greater than the monthly earnings of a person earning the federal minimum wage.

Member
8
22 days ago

We have to start producing our drugs, to ensure that Nigerians have access to an adequate supply of pharmaceuticals that are both affordable and of high quality.

Member
8
22 days ago

Importation of drug will threaten the security of the country because most of the drug we are using is import from outside assuming we are producing most of the drug we are using it will be easily to check and monitor it we need to improve our production of drugs in the country not to be depending on the imported ones

Member
8
22 days ago

Enforcing national drug security in the National Drug Policy is the best strategy to address all issues and ensure that Nigerians have access to an adequate supply of affordable, high-quality medications.

Member
8
22 days ago

This step would pave the way for economic growth in Nigeria as well as capacity expansion in the country’s pharmaceutical sector.

Member
9
22 days ago

70% of drugs used in Nigeria are imported. Please is 90%, even our government of Nigeria no believe in Nigeria. Nigeria is like fake country

Member
8
22 days ago

Ignorance and inadequate education are cited as reasons why Nigerians purchase low-quality pharmaceuticals from unregistered dealers rather than going to registered pharmacies to receive high-quality drugs.

Member
9
22 days ago

Urgent intervention is really in the aspect of drugs management in the country because the situation is not helping at all.How can a country with huge population like Nigeria depend on imported drugs and expect her economy to grow?.

Member
8
22 days ago

As a result of the existence of these procedures, there will be conformity with the provisions of the legislation and the policies of the government, which guarantees the safety of the drugs.

Member
8
21 days ago

It is evident that this will put our nation’s drug security at risk, and since we have a demand for drugs, anyone might theoretically bring them into the country.

Member
8
21 days ago

Drug importation threatens national security since most of the pharmaceuticals we use are imported. If we produced most of the drugs we use, we could easily inspect and monitor them.

Member
8
21 days ago

The only way to solve all problems and make sure Nigerians have access to enough low-cost, high-quality medicine is to make sure national drug security is a part of the National Drug Policy.

Member
8
21 days ago

Nigerians buy low-quality medications from unregistered vendors instead of registered pharmacies due to ignorance and poor education.

Member
8
20 days ago

Drug security is guaranteed with these procedures in place since laws and government rules will be followed.

Member
8
20 days ago

The National Drug Policy establishes the necessity of national drug security, which calls for the provision of a sufficient supply of affordable and high-quality pharmaceuticals to Nigerians.

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