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5 billion people at risk of trans fat menace

5 billion people at risk of trans fat menace
Photo by David Holifield- Ask Nigeria

43 countries have implemented best-practice policies for tackling trans fat.

A report by the World Health Organization has revealed that five billion people globally remain unprotected from harmful Industrially produced trans fat (also called industrially produced trans-fatty acids). Trans fats increase LDL cholesterol and decrease HDL cholesterol, which can increase the risk of heart diseases and other health problems. This comes in amidst the global movement launched by WHO to eradicate the menace. As estimated, global elimination of trans fats will save about 17.5 million lives over the next 25 years and prevent avoidable suffering.

WHO rolled out the REPLACE action package in 2018, which provides best-practice policies for eliminating industrially-produced trans-fatty acids from the global food supply by 2023. Following the roll out of the action package, 43 countries have implemented best-practice policies for tackling trans fat, with 2.8 million people now protected, a nearly six-fold increase. Despite these efforts, much remains to be done, with over 100 countries yet to take action which makes the goal look unachievable.

High intake of trans fat increases death risk by 34 percent.

Industrially produced trans fat is commonly found in packaged foods, baked goods, cooking oils and spreads. Trans fat intake accounts for about 500,000 premature deaths from coronary heart disease each year around the world. High intake of trans fats increases the risk of death from any cause by 34 percent and from coronary heart disease by 28 percent. Facts show that for every 1 percent increase in daily energy obtained from trans fats, coronary heart disease mortality rises by 12 percent.

Director General of WHO, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus explains that trans fat have no known benefits and huge health risks that incur huge costs for health systems. He said trans fat is a toxic chemical that kills, and should have no place in food. Currently, 9 of the 16 countries with the highest estimated proportion of coronary heart disease deaths caused by trans fat intake do not implement the best-practice policy. The countries named are Australia, Azerbaijan, Bhutan, Ecuador, Egypt, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Nepal, Pakistan and Republic of Korea.

WHO suggests two best-practice policy alternatives.

As established by WHO, the trans fat best-practices policies follow specific criteria and limit industrially produced trans fat in all settings. The global health organization suggests that total trans fat intake must not exceed 1% of total energy intake, which translates to less than 2.2grams per day for a 2,000-calorie diet. The highlighted two best-practice policy alternatives include a mandatory national limit of 2 grams of industrially produced trans fat per 100 grams of total fat in all foods and mandatory national ban on the production or use of partially hydrogenated oils (a major source of trans fat) as an ingredient in all foods.

In his remarks, Dr. Tom Frieden, President and CEO of Resolve to Save Lives, asserts that while trans fat continues to claim people’s lives, efforts towards curbing the menace is at risk of stalling. Governments can stop these preventable deaths by implementing a best-practice policy. While most trans fat elimination policies to date have been implemented in higher-income countries (largely in the Americas and in Europe), an increasing number of middle-income countries are adopting these policies, including Argentina, Bangladesh, India, Paraguay, Philippines and Ukraine.

Nigeria and others are considering the best-practice policies.

Best-practice policies are also being considered in Mexico, Nigeria and Sri Lanka in 2023. If implemented, Nigeria would be the second and most populous country in Africa to adopt trans fat best-practice elimination policy. Until recently, no low-income countries have yet adopted the best-practice policy to eliminate trans fat. As part of the efforts, WHO highlighted four priority recommendations for countries in 2023, which are adopting best-practice policies, monitoring and surveillance, healthy oil replacements and advocacy. The global health organization also urges food manufacturers to eliminate industrially produced trans fat from their products, aligning to the International Food and Beverage Alliance (IFBA) commitments.


Related Link

WHO: Website

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Admin
1
6 days ago

5 billion people at risk of trans fat menace43 countries have implemented best-practice policies for tackling trans fat. – Express your point of view.

Abusi
Member
8
6 days ago

Too much is injurious to the body system. We should be more aware about the kinds of food we can eat and those we can’t. It will help our health get secured.

Member
9
6 days ago

This figure is very alarming because it look like it almost 75% of the world population is at risk of this which is not good at all.All the agencies both international and local involving in the regulation of this should do their work diligently so as to reduce the effect.

Member
8
6 days ago

It will take a while before the policy release by WHO on best-practice policies for eliminating industrially-produced trans-fatty acids from the global food supply by 2023 will take effect.

Member
8
6 days ago

Trans fats are associated with a rise in bad cholesterol and a decrease in good cholesterol, which can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other health issues.

Member
8
6 days ago

Trans fat is a type of fat that is created industrially and can frequently be found in prepackaged foods, baked products, cooking oils, and spreads.

Member
8
6 days ago

It’s absurd to think that a high consumption of trans fats can raise the risk of dying from any cause by 34 percent, and it can raise the risk of dying from coronary heart disease by 28 percent.

Member
8
6 days ago

In spite of these efforts, a significant amount of work remains to be done; more than one hundred countries have yet to take action, which makes the objective appear impossible to achieve.

Member
8
6 days ago

People will not listen to the advice of the World Health Organization, which states that their total intake of trans fat should not exceed 1% of their total caloric intake.

Member
8
6 days ago

It works well. Additionally, the global health group encourages food manufacturers to remove industrially manufactured trans fat from their goods, in line with the pledges made by the International Food and Beverage Alliance.

Member
8
6 days ago

It is unfortunate that there are no low-income countries that have yet embraced the most effective method to get rid of trans fat.

Member
8
5 days ago

In excess, it can cause harm to the body. There has to be greater education about what foods are OK and which ones are not. It’s for the betterment of our health that this happens.

Member
8
5 days ago

People won’t heed the World Health Organization’s recommendation that they shouldn’t consume more trans fat than 1% of their daily calories.

Member
8
5 days ago

Nigeria should implement this law very soon to protect the the public from trans fat especially those who those who don’t know about the risk in taking it.

Member
8
5 days ago

We should be more aware about the kinds of food we can eat and those we can’t. It will help our health get secured. A lot still need to be done.

Member
9
5 days ago

Nigerians are so into all these confevtioneris how and our children needs to be cautioned because of the health risks attached to consumption of too much sugary things.

Member
8
5 days ago

This trans fat has been the major reason behind most death. Thanks to WHO who has rolled out REPLACE action package in 2018, which provides best-practice policies for eliminating industrially-produced trans-fatty acids from the global food supply by 2023. If adhere to by others countries who are yet to will greatly reduce the risk of trans fat in

Member
8
5 days ago

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) announcement of best-practice principles to eliminate industrially produced trans fatty acids from the world’s food supply by 2023 will take some time to become fully implemented.

Member
8
5 days ago

We need to be careful on what we consume that will not affect our health so we should be careful of trans fat not to consume too much of it

Member
9
5 days ago

5 billion people at risk of trans fat menace. Very risky, we need create awareness to the public to know about the risk on this harmful Industrially produced trans fat. Prevention is very necessary

Member
8
5 days ago

According to WHO guidelines, industrially produced trans fat is restricted in all situations and must meet certain standards. According to the World Health Organization, a 2,000 calorie diet should contain fewer than 2.2 grams of trans fat per day, or less than 1% of total caloric intake.

Member
8
5 days ago

Nigeria will likely begin cooperating as soon as the West African Coalition arrives, in my opinion. If we are to successfully tackle the difficulties facing our nation, we must present a united face.

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