Ask Nigeria Header Logo

Basic Education in Nigeria requires funding

Photo of author

By Mercy Kelani

1.2% of Nigeria’s GDP, below int’l benchmark, is allocated to education.

As a means of proffering solution to the rot and decadence in basic education in Nigeria, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) requested that the Federal Government ensures an allocation between the range of 45-50 percent of the country’s education budget to primary and secondary education. This call was made by the Chief of Education, UNICEF Nigeria, Saadhna Panday-Soobrayan, at a one-day seminar on Foundational Literacy and Numeracy in Nigeria. She lamented concerning the low investment in Nigeria’s basic education as it has greatly affected the results of learning at that level of education.

UNICEF Nigerian Chief of Education emphasized that the primary and secondary school sub-sector requires more investment, stating that basic education in the nation is confronted with challenges of out-of-school children and learning crisis. However, concerning inadequate qualified teachers in the country, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) asserted that an estimated 175,000 qualified teachers are required to fill the gaps in capacity so as to address the challenges of shortage of qualified teachers in the nation.

Majority of children enrolled in schools cannot read a simple sentence.

It was also stated that the one day seminar was mainly organized for promotion of the awareness of the Foundational Literacy and Numeracy (FLN) models and lessons from the enforcement of foundational learning programmes in Northern states in Nigeria. Some of the programmes which, according to the UN Agency, have improved learning outcomes in the North include Early Grade Reading (EGR), Reading Numeracy Activity (RANA), and Teaching at the Right Level (TaRL). Previously, RANA was implemented in two states but is currently being implemented in nine states where it reaches about 750,000 Northern learners.

Panday-Soobrayan affirmed that it was necessary to ensure sustainability of these programmes, boost them and make them accessible in the Northern regions of the country; UNICEF has likewise been trying different interventions to address the learning crisis in Nigeria. Asides from the country’s 10.2 million out-of-school children, those enrolled in schools are not learning as they should. A recent report disclosed that three out of four Nigerian children are unable to read a simple sentence or solve a simple math equation.

Interventions improve literacy and numeracy rates.

According to the Chief of Education, these challenges are complemented by the current low public fund allocation on education in Nigeria. Currently, only 1.2 percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is allocated to education, defiling the international benchmark of 4-6 percent of GDP. It was further stated that even the little allocated to the education sector is not spent appropriately. Higher education takes about 28 percent while children in primary schools are unable to read, write and count.

Therefore, UNICEF has saddled itself with the task of improving the successful interventions across the country. These interventions have undergone independent assessments and evaluations, and have proven their effective to aid improvement of literacy and Numeracy rate. The director of Basic Education of the Federal Ministry of Education, Dr. Folake Davies, affirmed that the Nigerian government commends the initiatives and would be interested in domestication of the programmes, given evidence of its effectiveness in the Northern region of the country.

National Language Policy, needed to replicate literacy programmes.

Dr. Davies added that the Federal Government has reviewed Nigeria’s National Language Policy (1985) which enables the use of mother tongue to teach school children. This is because the policy will help replication of some of these interventions in every part of the country as programmes like RANA are also taught in indigenous language. Majority of these are conducted in the immediate environment’s language. As a result, children should be taught in languages they understand.


Related Link

UNICEF: Website


The content on AskNigeria.com is given for general information only and does not constitute a professional opinion, and users should seek their own legal/professional advice. There is data available online that lists details, facts and further information not listed in this post, please complete your own investigation into these matters and reach your own conclusion. AskNigeria.com accepts no responsibility for losses from any person acting or refraining from acting as a result of content contained in this website and/or other websites which may be linked to this website.

Fact Checking Tool - Snopes.com

0 0 votes
Rate This Article
9 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
AN-Toni
AN-Toni
Editor
6 months ago

Basic Education in Nigeria requires funding.1.2% of Nigeria’s GDP, below int’l benchmark, is allocated to education.Express your point of view.

Iyanu12345ogg
Iyanu12345ogg
Member
6 months ago

To improve basic education in Nigeria, the government and private sector must significantly increase funding allocation to the education sector and ensure its implementation transparently. The funding must be used to provide quality infrastructure, train and retain quality teachers and provide instructional materials. This will increase access, quality, and equity in basic education and contribute to the overall development of Nigeria.

Abusi
Abusi
Member
6 months ago

There is need for us to fund our education. This academic system that we have is supposed to be a curve that will earmark us to be practical. It will help us apply our knowledge to practical situations.

Haykaylyon26
Haykaylyon26
Member
6 months ago

For basic education to be well standard the must increase the money allocated to basic education and invest more in it so innovation can be bought to the education

Kazeem1
Kazeem1
Member
6 months ago

Investing in basic education is necessary to improve it the funding in the basic education is too low to so much progress will not be seen in basic education

Christiana
Christiana
Member
6 months ago

The quality of education we have in Nigeria is too low especially the fundamental levels are rotten because the structure is not well built. More investment will surely revamp the system.

Taiwoo
Taiwoo
Member
6 months ago

Basic education in Nigeria is confronted with challenges of out-of-school children and learning crisis. Apart from that, we lack qualified teachers in these schools. Government should contribute huge budgets to addressing this dire issues.

Tonerol10
Tonerol10
Member
6 months ago

Basic Education in Nigeria requires funding. Education is not important to Buhari administration that is why asuu strike in his regime lasted for more than 7months. They refused to fund education. Nigeria have low standard of basic education. But now Buhari is launching new Wagon Assembly Plant. At the end of his 8years, just imagine. His 8years was pains and agony to many Nigerians

Adeolastan
Adeolastan
Member
6 months ago

Education is the key to success. For a country to grow more good education needed. Is through education every ideas and development set in. Government should fund our education well